The Endless Meal http://www.theendlessmeal.com Learn. Laugh. Feast. Fri, 27 Mar 2015 19:16:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Coconut Milk Braised Chicken http://www.theendlessmeal.com/coconut-milk-braised-chicken/ http://www.theendlessmeal.com/coconut-milk-braised-chicken/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 17:00:00 +0000 http://www.theendlessmeal.com/?p=11091 This chicken is the love child of Jamie Oliver’s delicious Chicken in Milk and my all-time favourite Thai flavours.  Slowly cooking the whole chicken for 2 hours in dreamy, creamy coconut milk, infused with lemongrass, ginger and lime leaves, creates the most tender and flavourful meat. Once you (very easily!) pull the chicken off the...

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Coconut Milk Braised Chicken

This chicken is the love child of Jamie Oliver’s delicious Chicken in Milk and my all-time favourite Thai flavours. 

Slowly cooking the whole chicken for 2 hours in dreamy, creamy coconut milk, infused with lemongrass, ginger and lime leaves, creates the most tender and flavourful meat.

Once you (very easily!) pull the chicken off the bone you serve it with the crazy delicious sauce poured over top and use each bite to sop it up. Serious yum!

What I love about this dish:

  1. The gentle Thai flavours are incredible.
  2. The meat is so tender you could easily mistake it for pulled chicken.
  3. Once the initial sear is over you can walk away and forget about this dish until it is done. The hands on time is really only 20 minutes, tops.
  4. It reheats beautifully. If you’re having company you can make this the day ahead. (See the notes below to find out how to pull this off like a pro.) I actually think it’s almost better the next day.
  5. Despite the richness of this dish all the ingredients are very healthy for you.

Healthy + Delicious = Awesome!

Coconut Milk Braised Chicken

So what does braising mean, anyway?

Don’t be intimidated by the term. Braising is really just fancy word that refers to cooking meat (sometimes veggies) in liquid for a long time on low heat. Think crock pot; it’s exactly the same technique except it’s done in a pot in your oven or on your stove.

Braising is best for cheaper, tougher cuts of meat as the long, gentle cooking process breaks down the connective tissues, melts the fat and lets the muscle tissue absorb moisture so the meat becomes very tender. It’s also 100% foolproof. If you can put meat in a pot and pour liquid over it, you can braise.

There are 2 ways you can braise meat: on the stovetop or in the oven. While many people swear by the oven method, I don’t personally notice a difference between the two as far as the taste or texture of the meat goes. I will typically use the stovetop method as I often want my oven free for other things I’m making. For both methods you want the heat to remain low and constant.

In this recipe I’ve used coconut milk as the liquid and added some ginger, lemongrass, lime leaves, cilantro and a few other tasty things to give it lots of flavour.

Coconut Milk Braised Chicken

Tips for Make Ahead Braised Chicken

If you’re making this chicken for company you may not want to deal with carving the meat and all the mess that comes with it at the same time you’re trying to set the table, finish the salad and do ev-er-y-thiiing else. Making this up to 2 days ahead is a great option. I’ve made this chicken ahead of time many times and it works beautifully, almost better than if you serve it right out of the pot.

Note: this can be done anytime you braise or roast a whole chicken.

  1. Once the chicken has finished cooking remove the whole chicken from the pot and put it on a baking sheet. Let it sit just until it is cool enough to handle, about 15 minutes. Pour the cooking liquid from a pot into a jar. Seal the jar and store it in your fridge.
  2. Take a second rimmed baking sheet and set it beside you. You will use this one for all the meat that comes off the chicken.
  3. Pull the wings off from the chicken and put them on the new baking sheet.
  4. Using a sharp knife cut the skin around each of the drumsticks. Then, using your hands, pull the drumstick and thigh from the chicken. Leave the bone in the drumstick and the one in the thigh but remove any smaller bones that might have come off when you separated it from the body. Do this for both sides.
  5. Slice the skin between the two breasts. Using your hands carefully remove each breast from the bone. You can either cut each breast in half lengthwise or carve them into smaller pieces.
  6. At this point I like to pick through the rest of the bones to find any other good meat. There’s usually at least a small handful of smaller pieces you can find.
  7. Wrap the tray tightly in plastic wrap and store it in your fridge for up to 2 days.

To Reheat the Chicken

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Remove the chicken from the fridge and take off the plastic wrap.
  3. Scoop the cooking liquid (it will have congealed) over the chicken. Cover the tray loosely with aluminum foil.
  4. Reheat the chicken for 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until the chicken is steaming and hot.
  5. Transfer the chicken and the sauce to a platter and serve right away.

Coconut Milk Braised Chicken

 I love to see pictures of the recipes you make! If you make this Coconut Milk Braised Chicken make sure to snap a pic of it and tag @theendlessmeal on Instagram so I can like and comment on it. :)

5.0 from 1 reviews
Coconut Milk Braised Chicken
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 whole chicken - 1-1.5 kg (2.2-3.5lb.)
  • 4 tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon very finely chopped lemongrass
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced ginger
  • 1 - 400 ml can unsweetened coconut milk (about 2 cups)
  • 2 lime leaves
  • Zest from 1 lime
  • 1 Thai red chili
  • 5 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 5 thin slices of ginger
  • 7-8 stems of cilantro
  • ½ cup chopped Thai basil
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Melt the coconut oil on medium high heat in an ovenproof pot just a little larger than your chicken.
  3. Combine the lemongrass sea salt and ginger in a small bowl. Pour in 1 tablespoon of the melted coconut oil and mix together well.
  4. If the chicken is tied, remove the string. Using your hands carefully separate the skin from the meat. Spread the sea salt rub under the skin. Be careful not to get it on the skin as the lemongrass and ginger will burn when you're browning the chicken.
  5. Place the chicken in the pot and brown it on all sides. Use a pair of tongs with one end inserted into the chicken to easily turn the chicken around in the pot.
  6. Once the chicken is browned on all sides (about 10 minutes) remove it from the pot. Pour out most of the coconut oil then add the coconut milk, lime leaves, lime zest, chili, garlic, ginger and cilantro. Put the chicken back in the pot, breast side up, cover the pot and put it in the preheated oven.
  7. Braise the chicken for 2 hours, or until it is falling off the bone and very tender.
To serve:
  1. Separate the meat from the bones and serve with the Thai basil over top and the cooking liquid (with the cilantro, etc. removed) on the side as a sauce. You may, if you'd like, reduce the sauce a little by boiling it for a few minutes before you serve it.
Notes
* If you'd rather braise this dish on the stovetop simply prepare the chicken as per the recipe but cook it over very low heat on your stove. You want the liquid to be at only the slightest simmer.

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Mashed Purple Yams with Sesame Brown Butter http://www.theendlessmeal.com/mashed-purple-yams-with-sesame-brown-butter/ http://www.theendlessmeal.com/mashed-purple-yams-with-sesame-brown-butter/#comments Sat, 21 Mar 2015 17:00:00 +0000 http://www.theendlessmeal.com/?p=11089  Eating purple yams is like having dessert for dinner. It’s the best.  Have you guys heard of, bought, cooked with Japanese purple yams before? If you haven’t you may have seen them, looking rather yam-like, next to the rest of the potato-y things. They look a lot like a regular yam, only they’re a little...

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Mashed Purple Yams with Sesame Brown Butter

 Eating purple yams is like having dessert for dinner. It’s the best. 

Have you guys heard of, bought, cooked with Japanese purple yams before? If you haven’t you may have seen them, looking rather yam-like, next to the rest of the potato-y things. They look a lot like a regular yam, only they’re a little skinnier and, obviously, purple. I’ve been walking by them for years.

It was a Facebook message I got from my friend Sally that said I need to stop ignoring these pretty purple yams that finally made me give them some attention. I’ve been experimenting with them for a while now and this is one of my favourite recipes.

It’s simple and lets the purple yams shine.

These purple yams are a lot sweeter than regular yams and the nutty brown butter and sesame oil turn them into that perfect sweet/savoury combo.

Serve this in place of sweet potatoes or even mashed potatoes. I think this would be a great side dish for Easter or Thanksgiving dinner.

Mashed Purple Yams with Sesame Brown Butter

When you’re buying purple yams you’ll want to look for the same characteristics as regular yams: firm, mostly unmarked skin with no soft spots.

Just like with a regular yam the skin is definitely edible, but the best part is the flesh.

Aside from being extra sweet and delicious, purple yams are also extra healthy for you. They’re packed full of anthocyanin (a natural anti-inflammatory), are a great source of vitamin A and potassium and are high in fibre and low in fat and carbs. Go on … eat ‘em up!

Mashed Purple Yams with Sesame Brown ButterMashed Purple Yams with Sesame Brown Butter

I love to see the recipes you make … If you make these Mashed Purple Yams with Sesame Brown Butter make sure to snap a pic and tag @theendlessmeal on Instagram so I can like and comment on them!

4.7 from 3 reviews
Mashed Purple Yams with Sesame Brown Butter
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1.5 lb. Asian purple yams
  • 2 tablespoons butter (See notes if you want to make this a vegan recipe)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon rice vinegar
  • Sea salt, to taste
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds (or a mix of toasted and black sesame seeds)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking tray with parchment paper.
  2. Place the yams on the prepared baking sheet - do not pierce their skins! - and bake them for 30-45 minutes, or until they can easily be pierced with a knife. (They can vary in size quite a bit and the larger ones will take longer to cook.) Remove them from the oven and, when they are cool enough to handle, cut them in half and scrape out the flesh. Discard the skins.
  3. While the yams are roasting make the brown butter. Put the butter in a small frying pan over medium high heat. The butter will first melt, then become very frothy and finally it will start to brown. Once the froth starts to die down a little keep a close eye on it and start to stir the butter so you can see exactly what is going on. You want lots of dark brown bits in the butter. This should take about 5-7 minutes. Once the butter is very brown remove it from the heat and pour it into a small bowl to stop the cooking. Stir in the sesame oil.
  4. Mash the yams with a fork and add all but 1 teaspoon of the brown butter/sesame oil. Add the rice vinegar to the yams and stir till everything is well combined. Season to taste with sea salt.
  5. Serve the yams with the remaining brown butter drizzled overtop and sprinkle on some sesame seeds.
  6. Yum!
Notes
You can substitute Earth Balance for the butter in this recipe. Of course it does not taste exactly like butter, nor does it brown quite the same, but if you eat a vegan only diet then it does make a very good substitute in this recipe.

 

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Cauliflower ‘Polenta’ with Mushrooms and Hazelnuts http://www.theendlessmeal.com/cauliflower-polenta-with-mushrooms-and-hazelnuts/ http://www.theendlessmeal.com/cauliflower-polenta-with-mushrooms-and-hazelnuts/#comments Wed, 18 Mar 2015 11:30:00 +0000 http://www.theendlessmeal.com/?p=11086 I’ve been obsessed with turning cauliflower into things it’s totally not.  Like polenta. Cauliflower makes great polenta. It’s every bit as creamy and comforting as the real thing, but so much healthier for you. You got to admit, regular polenta is pretty boring and bland, unless you add mountains of butter, cream and cheese to...

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Roasted Cauliflower 'Polenta' with Mushrooms and Hazelnuts

I’ve been obsessed with turning cauliflower into things it’s totally not. 

Like polenta. Cauliflower makes great polenta. It’s every bit as creamy and comforting as the real thing, but so much healthier for you.

You got to admit, regular polenta is pretty boring and bland, unless you add mountains of butter, cream and cheese to flavour it. Not that I have anything against butter, cream and cheese, but I don’t want to eat tons of it for dinner every night.

In this totally paleo + vegan version of polenta the cauliflower is roasted with onions and garlic so it has tons of natural sweet, nutty, buttery flavour. Once it comes out of the oven it goes for a spin in the food processor till it’s perfectly creamy, just like real polenta.

Topped with some seared mushrooms and toasted hazelnuts this cauliflower polenta becomes a great, healthy, veggie loaded dinner.

Roasted Cauliflower 'Polenta' with Mushrooms and Hazelnuts

 A few notes about this recipe

You’ll see that the recipe takes an hour to make, might seem like a lot if you want to make this after a long day at work. Most of that time though is hands-off while you’re waiting for the cauliflower to roast. The hands-on time is only about 30 minutes, at most.

Here’s how to save the most amount of time:

  • Put the hazelnuts in the oven right away. There’s no need to worry about waiting for the oven to heat up; the hazelnuts can start toasting while it’s heating.
  • Once you chop the cauliflower put it in the oven right away. Just like with the hazelnuts it can start roasting while the oven warms.
  • Start the mushrooms sautéing next. While they’re sizzling in the pan you can hope the onions and get the garlic ready and chop the hazelnuts.
  • Next, clean everything up, pop the onions and garlic into the oven, then go chill out for a bit.
  • Once the cauliflower is nice and dark roasted you’ll be eating dinner in only 5 minutes.

If you’re making this ahead of time

You can make the polenta up to a day in advance, then warm in gently over low heat with a small splash of water added to the pan.

You can also toast the hazelnuts in advance. I will often toast more than I need and keep the extra on hand to toss into salads during the week.

Roasted Cauliflower 'Polenta' with Mushrooms and Hazelnuts

 

Cauliflower 'Polenta' with Mushrooms and Hazelnuts
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup hazelnuts
  • 1 medium head of cauliflower, roughly chopped
  • ½ medium yellow onion, roughly chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, in their skin
  • 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons olive oil, divided
  • 3 cups chopped mushrooms (I like to use a mix of shiitake and bottom mushrooms
  • ⅓-1/2 cup stock or water
  • 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast (or sub parmesan cheese)
  • For garnish: chopped parsley and hazelnut or argan oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Place the hazelnuts on a small baking tray and toast in the oven for 7-10 minutes, or until they are golden and fragrant. Once the hazelnuts are out of the oven increase the oven temp to 400 degrees. Roughly chop the hazelnuts once they are cool enough to touch.
  3. Place the chopped cauliflower on the baking tray and drizzle with 1 teaspoon of the oil. Put it in the oven and set the timer for 30 minutes. (You don't need to wait for the hazelnuts to come out of the oven first.)
  4. Place the chopped onion in a bowl and drizzle with ½ teaspoon olive oil. Place the garlic in a small piece of aluminium foil and drizzle another ½ teaspoon olive oil over top. Wrap the garlic into a package.
  5. After a half hour remove the cauliflower from the oven and turn each piece over. Add the onion to the cauliflower and place the foil wrapped garlic on the sheet too. Return the baking sheet to the oven and bake for another 20 minutes.
  6. While the cauliflower is roasting prepare the mushrooms.
  7. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large frying pan over medium high heat. Add the mushrooms and sauce, stirring only occasionally, until the mushrooms are dark brown, about 8 minutes.
  8. Once the cauliflower comes out of the oven put it, the onions and the garlic (remove the skin from the garlic first) into a food processor. Add the stock or water and the nutritional yeast or parmesan cheese and blend until it is creamy. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
To serve:
  1. Divide the cauliflower polenta between 2 plates. Top with the mushrooms, chopped hazelnuts, parsley and a drizzle of hazelnut or argan oil..

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The Ultimate Guide to Beets http://www.theendlessmeal.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-beets/ http://www.theendlessmeal.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-beets/#respond Sun, 15 Mar 2015 17:00:00 +0000 http://www.theendlessmeal.com/?p=10744 Beets are one of those veggies that most people have to learn to love, but once you do there’s no turning back. We all know that they make a great side dish, but did you know they’re just as delicious at breakfast, in drinks or even in dessert? In this ultimate guide to beets you’ll...

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The Ultimate Guide to Beets

Beets are one of those veggies that most people have to learn to love, but once you do there’s no turning back. We all know that they make a great side dish, but did you know they’re just as delicious at breakfast, in drinks or even in dessert?

In this ultimate guide to beets you’ll find information on different types of beets, how to buy and store them, why they’re so healthy and tons and tons of different recipes. Make sure to check out the bottom of the post for some fun facts about beets.


Beet Recipe Index

Breakfast Beet Recipes                               Beet Soup Recipes
Appetizer Beet Recipes                               Beet Sandwich Recipes
Side Dish Beet Recipes                               Beet Salad Recipes
Main Dish Beet Recipes                             Beet Noodle Recipes Recipes
Dessert Beet Recipes                                  Beet Greens Recipes
Drink Beet Recipes                                     Beet Bread Recipes
Beet Condiment Recipes

For more beet inspiration follow my Beets Pinterest Board


Types of Beets

 Red Beets

Red beetroot is very common. There are all sorts of different varieties of red beets, but unless you’re buying them from a farmer’s market or directly from the farmer, you’ll likely just see them labelled as ‘beets’ or ‘red beets’.

Red beets have a habit of dying everything they come into contact with. If you’re roasting them with golden beets make sure to roast them separately so they don’t turn the golden ones red.

Golden or Yellow Beets

Golden beets are starting to become more common in grocery stores. They have a rusty orange skin and beautiful yellow flesh.

I find their flavour more mellow and less earthy than red beets, so they’re great for someone who’s uncertain about beet’s distinctive flavour. They’re also gorgeous on a plate beside red beets.

Striped or Chioggia Beets

Striped beets have pretty rings of colour, similar to a candy cane. I like them best sliced paper thin and served raw so you can see their strips. Once you cook them most of their bands of colour disappear.

Baby Beets

Baby beets are simply young beets that have been pulled from the ground early. They’re extra tender and a real treat. I like to roast them with both a few inches of their stems and their tails on; they’re extra pretty this way.

Sugar Beets

Sugar beets are a variety of beet that is grown commercially for its high sugar content. They’re white in colour and much larger than a typical cooking beet.


How to Buy and Store Beets

Ideally you want to look for beets with their leaves still attached. The freshest beets will have vibrant and healthy looking leaves and be relatively free of blemishes.

It’s not always possible to buy beets with their leaves. If you ‘re buying beets without their leaves look for ones that feel very firm and have few blemishes. Also look at the top, this is the first spot you’ll generally see signs of mold.

Once you bring them home remove the leaves right away. The bigger leaves can be cooked like spinach, and the younger, smaller ones can be eaten raw in a salad.

The stems of beets are also delicious. Don’t throw them away! They taste very similar to celery and can be used in its place. I love tossing a handful into my salads for some crunch.

The beetroot itself should be stored in a bag in your fridge. Do not wash them before storing.

While beets are best eaten fresh they will last for at least 2-3 weeks in your fridge. If you notice a spot of mold (a dark black spot) on a beet simply cut it off before roasting it.


Peeling Your Beets

While most people peel their beets, it is definitely not a must-do step. Just like with a potato, often a good scrub will do the trick.

Most recipes will tell you to roast the beets first and then peel them. I personally think this is crazy. Peeling beets is as easy as peeling potatoes, and if you do it before they’re cooked it’s a whole lot less messy.

Whether you peel before or after you cook them really just comes down to personal preference. Try it both ways and see which works best for you.

And don’t panic if this is the first time your hands have been dyed beet red. By the time you finish cooking dinner (and have washed your hands a few times a long the way) the red colour will have washed off.


Beet Season

Beets are a cold weather crop that are typically planted about a month or so before the last frost. Depending on the climate you live in you may also be able to plant another crop at the end of summer to harvest in late fall.

If you live in a temperate climate, where it doesn’t get warmer than 23 degrees (75 Fahrenheit) or colder than 10 degrees (50 Fahrenheit), then you’ll be able to grow beets year round.

Most beets take between 55-70 days to mature, depending on the variety.


Health

Despite their sweet flavour beets are very low in carbs. They’re also high in vitamin b, folate and are a good source of many minerals.

Arguably the best thing about beets is that they’re high in nitrate which, when your body processes the nitrate in beets, gets converted to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide relaxes your blood vessels and, as a result, increases circulation.

There’s tons of research showing that nitric oxide can do everything from reducing your blood pressure, to giving you more energy, to helping your body recover after a workout. It’s also been known to work as a natural Viagra.


 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 

The Ultimate Guide to Beets

 


Fun Facts

  • Beets are being turned into fuel to power our world. In California sugar beets are being grown and processed into ethanol. Apparently these “energy beets” produce twice as much ethanol per acre than corn.
  • To test acidic or alkaline your body is, eat beets. If you pee pink after you eat beets that generally means that you have low stomach acid. That’s a good thing!
  • Beets can help your sex life. Eating beets will help expand your blood vessels and increase your blood flow. As we all know, increasing blood flow can have a very positive effect on our sex lives. Beets also contain boron, which is a mineral directly related to the production of sex hormone. Go on, eat your beets! :)

Sources:

  • http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/bountiful-beets?page=0,1
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beets
  • http://www.nutritionexpress.com/showarticle.aspx?articleid=286
  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/23/beets-ethanol_n_2940868.html
  • https://www.pritikin.com/your-health/health-benefits/reverse-heart-disease/331-sex-nitric-oxide-and-your-heart.html#.VQXUUkKBDds
  • http://www.regenerativenutrition.com/boron-osteoporosis-arthritis-allergies-menopause-hormones.asp
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beeturia

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Sir Fried Okra with Garlic, Chilies and Lime http://www.theendlessmeal.com/sir-fried-okra-with-garlic-chilies-and-lime/ http://www.theendlessmeal.com/sir-fried-okra-with-garlic-chilies-and-lime/#comments Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:00:00 +0000 http://www.theendlessmeal.com/?p=11320  Okra must be properly cooked in order to be worth eating.  Wait, that goes for any vegetable out there. The only difference is that okra, when it’s NOT cooked properly, can be particularly, ummm, gross. Yep, I said it. But … with a quick pan fry all that stickiness that gives okra a bad rap...

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Sir Fried Okra with Garlic, Chilies and Lime

 Okra must be properly cooked in order to be worth eating. 

Wait, that goes for any vegetable out there. The only difference is that okra, when it’s NOT cooked properly, can be particularly, ummm, gross. Yep, I said it.

But … with a quick pan fry all that stickiness that gives okra a bad rap seems to vanish. What you’re left with are bites of greens that have just the right amount of chew left and tons of flavour from all the other things you’ve stir-fried them in.

I’ve been obsessing with these flavours ever since I shared the recipe for Coconut Oil Fried Brussels Sprouts with Garlic, Chilies and Lime with you a little while back. This recipe uses a whole lot less coconut oil but keeps the spicy, garlicky, tangy tastes.

I should mention that this flavour packed (and healthy!) side dish takes only 15 minutes to whip up. Awesome, right?!

If you’ve ever had a bad experience with, or been uncertain about trying, okra, this is a great recipe to make.

Sir Fried Okra with Garlic, Chilies and Lime

I’ll admit, I’m not a southern girl who grew up eating okra in every dish imaginable. (Or at least that’s what I image a southern American girl would eat. True?) It wasn’t until my early 20s that I even tried okra, and that first experience wasn’t a good one. It was the texture I just couldn’t get over.

I tried it a second time when my good friend Basil invited me over for dinner. He served a Middle Eastern okra stew that this mom used to make for him when he was a kid. It was awesome. No weird slimy texture in sight.

It really is all about how you cook it.

Sir Fried Okra with Garlic, Chilies and Lime

In this recipe the trick is to not crowd the pan. You don’t want to steam them, but rather sear them quickly. See all those deliciously browned bits? That’s where the flavour lies.

And the garlic, shallots and chilies add a whole whop of flavour too.

About the chilies … Two chilies in this dish is spicy. Not going to lie. It will burn your tongue in the most delightful way. If you’re less of a masochist you’ll want to use less chilies, or perhaps just remove their fiery seeds.

Sir Fried Okra with Garlic, Chilies and Lime

 Do you have a great okra recipe? I would love to hear your tips and tricks for making okra in the comments!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Sir Fried Okra
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 2 large sides
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 10 ounces okra, cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 - 1 inch piece of ginger, julienned
  • 2 medium shallots, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1-2 red chilies, thinly sliced
  • 1 lime
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 small handful cilantro, roughly chopped
Instructions
  1. Melt 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium high heat. Add half the okra. I like to turn most of the okra in the pan cut side facing down so it browns really well. After 1 minute sprinkle half the ginger, shallots, chilies and garlic over the okra. Sauté, occasionally shaking the pan to toss the okra, for about 5 minutes, or until the okra has browned well. Set the okra aside in a bowl. Repeat with the remaining coconut oil, okra, ginger, shallots, garlic and chilies.
  2. Plate the okra, squeeze over some lime and sprinkle on the toasted sesame seeds, some cilantro and a pinch of sea salt.

 

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