Buttermilk Panna Cotta

Buttermilk Panna Cotta

by Kristen on July 7, 2013

Buttermilk Panna Cotta

I love easy make ahead desserts. Put the desserts in cute little mason jars and I go a bit giddy. Just look how cute they are!

Buttermilk Panna Cotta

I’m  little new to this whole panna cotta thing. Seriously, I only tried it about a month ago for the first time. And after many frustrating hours spent trying to fix a a batch from a recipe that did not work at all (grrr!) I swore I’d never make it again. But I’m a little stubborn sometimes.

With a little a bunch help from Faith Durand and her article about Why Panna Cotta Is the Perfect Dessert I was able to get an idea about what the proper milk/gelatine ratio is for panna cotta.

Buttermilk Panna Cotta

I’ve made this recipe now a few times and can guarantee you it works great and tastes delicious. It is soft and creamy and a tiny bit tangy from the buttermilk. It can be made up to three days in advance so is the perfect make ahead dessert for a dinner party. I always serve it in little 125ml mason jars rather than unfolding them. I just think they look better that way :)

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5.0 from 3 reviews
Buttermilk Panna Cotta
 
Author:
Serves: Makes 6 - ½ cup servings
Ingredients
  • 1¼ cups of buttermilk
  • ¼ cup of sour cream
  • ⅓ cup of sugar
  • 2¼ teaspoons of gelatine
  • 1½ cups of whipping cream
Instructions
  1. Pour the buttermilk into a small sauce pan and sprinkle the gelatine over top. Let sit for 2 minutes, or until the gelatine grains start to swell or "bloom."
  2. Stir in the sugar and heat gently over low heat until the sugar and gelatine have completely dissolved. DO NOT BOIL.
  3. Remove from heat and whisk in the sour cream and whipping cream. Place in fridge for 30 minutes, or until cool to the touch.
  4. Once cool, whisk the panna cotta once more and then pour into little mason jars, cups or whatever cute little jars you plan on serving it in.
  5. Cover and refrigerate until set, about 4 hours.

 

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{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

Dina

this sounds delish! i love buttermilk and creamy desserts!

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Sarah

Your pictures are gorgeous! Love all the color :)

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Karen

Panna cotta is one of my favorite desserts. Serving it in little mason jars is a great idea!

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tony

Hi Kristen – I’m sure it tastes as fabulous as it looks! The mason jar is perfect!

A while back I found a similar recipe in an Italian/French food blog for a buttermilk maple syrup pannacotta… I liked it because it was so exact (a bit strange but everything is in grams including liquids) and has worked every time!

Here it is if you’d like to give it a go:

480g buttermilk
220g simple cream
50g sugar
70g maple syrup
8g powdered gelatine

boil cream and sugar
add gelatine and whisk to dissolve
add buttermilk and maple syrup – mix
pour into serving bowls or mason jars and chill for 1-2 hours until set
pour a layer of maple syrup over the surface before serving

Reply

Kristen

Hi Tony,

Buttermilk maple panna cotta sounds delicious! The next time I make panna cotta I am definitely going to try this recipe.

It always is a bit funny seeing a recipe all in grams but I actually prefer it that way. It has taken me a bit to get used to always using my scale but when I do recipes always turn out better. Even though it still feels a bit funny I think it is just a lot more accurate.

You are so awesome for sending the recipe. Thank you so much!

Reply

Meg

Hello!
This looks amazing, and I would absolutely love to make it!
However, I am vegetarian! Do you have any recommendations for an ingredient that could easily replace the gelatine?
There are many vegetarian alternatives to gelatine, but perhaps you have a preference among them?
Thanks :)

Reply

Kristen

Hi Meg,

I do know that you can use agar as a thickening agent instead of gelatine in some desserts to make them vegetarian. From the little I know of it though it does tend to be a little gritty and does need to be boiled before it is activated. I also believe that the amount you need will be less than gelatine, although I’m not sure exactly how much you will need to use. Would definitely be worth experimenting with though!

If you do try to use agar instead I would love to hear how it turns out for you :)

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